The GoPro Phenomenon

IMG_0949.PNG

I own three GoPros. I bought one for myself and received two others as presents. I couldn’t wait to own one because I thought I would walk around recording everything I saw. I liked the idea of having a record of all the events I attended.

Then reality set in. This wasn’t going to be a simple edit job. This was serious, dedicated, and sophisticated work. I gave up my desire to be a GoPro user immediately.

It turns out that the GoPro is really meant for those who truly live an active lifestyle. like extreme sports enthusiasts. It’s very important for them to review their every move plus share it with others.

This past week, the New Yorker magazine did the most remarkable article on the GoPro Gestalt psychology. I loved reading it because it talked about the many go-getters who use a GoPro and why. The article said, “In the past five years, videos posted by GoPro owners have attracted half a billion views. On the GoPro channel on YouTube, videos average about half a million viewers each.”

I have included a link to the story because I thought you would want to read why “We are all a camera.” Click here to read the article,

The End Of An Era

IMG_0801.JPG

IMG_0800.JPG

My friend Ben needed more time to address yesterday’s topic. He was busy today doing “new business” so his input tomorrow should be quite interesting.

I normally would be so intolerant of someone else telling this next story. I have no patience for people who dwell on self-absorbing, trivial details. This time, I can’t help myself. Neither can Eliot. We were very sad all day today because we had to give up our blue 1989, 560 SEL Mercedes. This limo-looking automobile had given us 25 years of great times.

Huffing and puffing at 124,000 miles, my long-time devoted carrier. was beginning to show old age. In the last year, Eliot and I got stuck twice on
a highway because the engine just shutdown when it overheated. The interiors were slightly deteriorating and the bumpers sported scratches thanks to New York City garage attendants.

Because this car was so old, we had to live without cup holders, USB inputs, and remote control keys. None of the modern day conveniences were available then.

I was getting increasingly nervous riding around in a car that was decades older than any other moving vehicle on-the-road. At this point in my life, I don’t want to put myself in uncomfortable situations.

It’s difficult to believe that we will never ride in that car again. I keep telling myself that it’s only a hunk of steel. It doesn’t have a heartbeat. That doesn’t seem to matter. We didn’t sleep well last night thinking about the departure of our dear friend. Tonight we are talking about buying it back.

We won’t do that because we know that we made the right decision. We also won’t be buying a new car to replace the old one. It’s now time for us to become part of the Uber or Zip Car generation. We need to embrace the new options the digital age affords us. No more $500 New York garage fees, insurance costs, and expensive repairs.

We are going to miss you old buddy. You were worth every cent.

We’re Not Done Yet

IMG_0798.JPG Image: Cosmos Kramer

Jerry Lewis was on the Jimmy Fallon Show last night because he was in New York for a Friar’s Club honor. He said that he got the chance to take the subway for the first time in 50 years.

At one of the stops, a young guy gets on the train wearing a complete white leather outfit, high boots, rings in his ears, nose, chin, and eye brows and his hair was spiked green, blue, orange, and pink.

He saw Jerry staring at him and said, “What’s wrong old man? Haven’t you ever done anything outrageous in your life?”

Jerry replied, “As a matter of fact, I have. I once had sex with my parrot and thought you might be my kid.”

Now for today’s blog post.

I don’t claim to be a career expert. Actually, let me retract that. Maybe, I am an expert on seniors in the workplace,. After all, I am one. I have positioned myself in the tech industry the same way Joan Rivers was viewed in comedy, a unique character that is loved and hated at the same time.

Look, we all know, I’m no Joan Rivers, the same way Dan Quayle was no Jack Kennedy. However, I do go out of my way (like Joan) to insert myself in projects and become vital to its success.

Most people my age would never think of reinventing themselves or re-examine what they truly have to offer others. I try not to laugh too hard when I hear one of my contemporaries say that they have a lot of experience to share with the younger set. “I have been doing this for decades,” they claim. “I have a lot that I can teach.”

As far as I am concerned, those are the worst words a senior person can express. Young people today do not want to learn from older folks. They want to emulate and mimic the current stars (the big money makers) in their industries. Yes, there are exceptions to the new rules, but by and large, seniors have to adopt new practices.

I always talk in the future; what has to be done and what we need to do to get there. I spend countless hours thinking of innovative new approaches and creating big idea that are almost impossible to achieve. Sometimes, I over promise, but the results are always better than what my “play it safe” counterparts would promise. I enjoy big goals and like to make things happen.

I also go overboard complimenting the younger people I work with. Everyone needs encouragement and it is my role to provide that inspiration and energy. I don’t make it up. I just look for the personal assets and emphasize them to the respective individuals.

We all have our own ways of doing things. I hope those that absorb my words can read between the lines and apply them to what works for their careers. Don’t let the number of our age dictate our future.

Tomorrow: my friend Ben tells us why I am full of shit. We will learn his side of the story about being a senior in the workplace today.

Seniors Need To Reclaim Worth In Workplace

IMG_0794-0.JPGImage: menshealth.co.uk

In the last few weeks, I have spoken to several men friends who are losing their jobs after being at their companies for decades. Of course, my dear pals are either in their 50s, 60s or 70s. My heart sinks for them because I know they feel they have lost their identities. They say not, but I know better.

I just celebrated 48 years of working (September 9, 1966) and there is very little I have not seen in business. I feel we are a point in time when seniors are getting persecuted because younger folks, who have positions of authority, feel more inferior about themselves than ever before.

Young people in business today are all striving to be the next Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Cuban, Larry Page, Sergey Brin, and Elon Musk. If they are not billionaires by 40, many start to feel desperate to make it happen. They look around at the executive team and want to rid themselves of seniors who might recognize their deficiencies. They also want to surround themselves with young people who might offer up the “secret sauce,” code word for a successful formula.

I have analyzed this many times in recent years. I do have many suggestions for seniors who want to stay in the workforce but you are going to have to return tomorrow to read my recommendations.

In the meantime, I want my friends to know that their forced exits have nothing to do with them. While they may be devastated now, they are going to be deliriously happy very soon if they join the entrepreneurial workforce. Thrilling times ahead. Just stick close.

From GTO to Electric Chariot

IMG_0777.JPG

IMG_0778.JPGThe Foldaway Electric Scooter open and folded.

IMG_0760.JPGIn the window of Hammacher Schlemmer

I think I was born old, or at least an old soul. Many times when I buy a new piece of furniture, look at a new apartment or house, or shop for clothes, I wonder if it will still be appropriate when I’m older. I also get great comfort watching communities prepare for the aging of America. I appreciate it when I see apartments/homes with walk-in showers, hand rails, panic buttons, and security features.

I’m not alone. Every once in a while, I hear friends say they plan to stay active well into their senior years. Now that Uber and other car services are available, they plan to be on-the-go as much as possible.

I’m sure we are going to see more and more products and services available to keep seniors living a full life. I was rather surprised when I saw the Foldaway Electric Scooter in the window of the newly-renovated Hammacher Schlemmer on 57th St. in Manhattan. The window is usually reserved for products that fit into the extreme sports arena. The retailer has taken an about-face.

Hammacher Schlemmer must have read the recent report from the Department for Aging. The 60-plus population in NYC increased 12.4 percent between 2000 and 2010. By 2030 it is projected to grow by 35.3 percent to 1.84 million.

I guess showing off the new electric scooter in the highly-visible window was telling seniors who have physical challenges to remain active. It has a big front basket for groceries or other supplies. The Scooter’s aluminum frame folds down to 50% of its size (38″ L x 20″ W x 30 3/4″ D) for storage. Its retractable seat lets riders either sit or stand while keeping both feet on the footrests. The scooter can go up to 17 miles on a three-hour charge. It retails for $1,600.

Start saving up.

A Hand Soother

IMG_0774.JPG
If you have ever had a manicure, then you know the joys of the hand massage you get just before the nail polish gets applied. I look forward to these moments dearly.

This hand reflexology massager gives you a soothing, yet gentle, hand massage. According to Hammacher Schlemmer, the unit triggers points on the palm and back of hand using a mechanical air pressure system that kneads. Once you put your hand in, the unit tightly grips it so you can feel maximum pressure. You have to press the stop button in order to release your hand. I was startled at first, but it does make sense.

I tried it out today and I felt like my total body was relaxing. My hands were finally getting a vacation. Instead of constantly being in motion, my hands were getting physical therapy. It just felt that good,

Retails for $129.95. I would love to get two but then I would have to rely on Eliot to set me free. Hmm.

6 plus 128 GB

IMG_0755.JPGThe center of the universe, Fifth Avenue at 59th St. NYC.

I bought the iPhone 6 plus, 128 GB, in slate gray. It wasn’t a tough choice for me because I lost my iPad two months ago and this is going to be the replacement. I am counting on the additional length to be just right for reading newspapers, magazines, and books.

I’m actually quite excited because I have been squinting for too long. I’m not going to get the new iPhone for a few weeks because we ordered it from our local Verizon store. Eliot woke up at 3am on Saturday morning to buy the unit for me but the Apple site was down even though they said that was when they would be open for business. He tried getting into the site for an hour and then was just too exhausted to stay up any little longer.

He ordered the iPhone 6 Plus later at lunchtime. Tonight we had dinner with our friends on Central Park South. In the walk back home, we stopped by the Apple store. People were already lined up waiting to be the first to own the new iPhones. Who are these people and why do they have the time to sit and wait?

IMG_0741-0.JPG
11:00pm and the Apple store was packed. I needed a new cord so we ventured inside. It’s still a wonderment to me.

IMG_0749.JPG

IMG_0751.JPG

IMG_0745.JPG

IMG_0748.JPG

IMG_0746.JPG

IMG_0747.JPG
So that’s a wrap.

El Paso Threatened By ISIS

IMG_0738.JPG

I had to make a decision today. Was I going to wait for the news to come to me, or was I going to go where the news was being made? I didn’t really have much of a choice if I wanted to find out more about how the city of El Paso, TX was being threatened by Islamic terrorists who reportedly were going to cross the Mexican border in order to attack the United States.

On this day of 9/11, I was dumbfounded to find out that New York was relatively safe but the people of a secondary city like El Paso (that’s probably being too kind) had to live in fear. I first learned about the situation from a 25-year old brand manager who works for my client, Helen of Troy, a billion dollar manufacturer of hair appliances located in El Paso, TX.

During a conference call this morning, Leslie told me that most of the activities in the city were being cancelled because there were reports “that the militant group of the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) were working in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez so they could attack the United States with vehicle borne improvised explosive devices (VBIED).” El Paso, Texas, is the home of Ft. Bliss, the Army’s second-largest installation..

At first I thought she was kidding me, I Googled “El Paso ISIS” and found two small stories about the situation from a local FOX station and a weekly Texas newspaper. No major coverage, just a few mentions here and there.

Then I went to Twitter. In one easy flick of a click, I found plenty of tweets to let me know how grave of a situation it was down there,

John Galt (@jgalt666)
ISIS may have formed a terrorist cell in or near Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, a Mexican border city across from El Paso.

Larry Stewart (@Larry_Stewart)
Rolling thru El Paso, looking to the south. The border within a mile or two. Wondering if that’s where ISIS might… fb.me.

cheryl (@HNSCCH)
ISIS is crossing the boarder from Mexico to El Paso people going to the wwa date PLEASE BE CAREFUL

Charles Dickerson (@ChasD3)
FEDS WARN OF IMMINENT ISIS ATTACK ON SO. BORDER — UPDATE — ISIS Openly Operating Just Yards From El Paso, Texas |

b-dawg (@Beee_8)
Everyone outside El Paso “omg run hide Isis!!!” Everyone in El Paso ” you going to chicos or chipotle

Dee (@MBTI_Geek)
A warning bulletin for an imminent terrorist attack on the border has been issued

Bianca (@chavezbianca)
Why am I the only one on my tl freaking about ISIS’s threats on El Paso? “Coming soon” can mean 9/11

So the next time you are curious about something, go to the search box on Twitter, type in a few key words, and watch how you will be inundated with info in just a few more hours.

Good luck !

The National September 11 Memorial Museum

Eliot and I were one of the first New Yorkers to see the new National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center. Our friend, journalist Rob Calem, gave us his tickets because he had an assignment out-of-town. He was invited along with all of the other residents in lower Manhattan who were displaced when the Towers came down. It’s been 13 years and the pain of losing the nearly 3000 people who perished is as strong as ever.

IMG_0676.JPG Information Center

IMG_0689.JPGSection of Steel Facade, North Tower, floors 96 to 99.

IMG_0694.JPG

IMG_0722.JPGThe Remains of the Survivor Staircase

IMG_0701.JPGNorth Tower Communications Center

IMG_0708.JPG

IMG_0714.JPG

IMG_0715.JPG

IMG_0730.JPG

IMG_0732.JPG

IMG_0736.JPG

IMG_0733.JPGThank You Rob. It was very kind of you to allow us to go in your place. We were overwhelmed being among folks who were closely connected to the World Trade Center.

Visitors walked quietly through the rooms reading every word on the posted plaques. Those that held hands were probably the families of the victims. Our hearts sank as we passed each one. Others were policemen, firemen, medical first responders, and nearby neighbors. You could see the horrific memories on their faces. They all wanted to show their solidarity. Of course, we did too.

The museum allowed us to take photos except in the “Day Of” rooms where many personal belongings were on display. Cameras were off limits. These were the tougher rooms to explore. There were warning signs letting you know that some of the displays and videos were explicit. We just can’t imagine how the families of those who died were able to walk through these rooms. It was very emotional.

Bill Gates Takes Active Role Changing The Way History Is Taught

A few days ago, the financial columnist for the New York Times and co-anchor of CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” Andrew Ross Sorkin, wrote an article about how Bill Gates wants to change the way high school students learn history. The reason why I’m spotlighting this story is because it’s interesting to see how a tech pioneer wants to spend his billions.

You can read the story here. Gates is serious about this initiative. He doesn’t want to sell this concept to school districts. He would rather target each and every high school in the United States to make sure they are 100 per cent committed to the program.

Gates got enthralled with this project after he watched a DVD called “Big History” by Australia professor David Christian. Gates loved the way Christian wove together “a synthesis of history, biology, chemistry, astronomy and other disparate fields.” He then divided the history of the world “into eight separate “thresholds,” beginning with the Big Bang, 13 billion years ago (Threshold 1), moving through to the origin of Homo Sapiens (Threshold 6), the appearance of agriculture (Threshold 7) and, finally, the forces that gave birth to our modern world (Threshold 8).

If you want to order the DVD’s, click here.

Be sure to watch Christian”s TED Talk below.