Facebook Friends Hear From Sheryl Sandberg 

I was stunned tonight when I saw a post from Sheryl Sandberg on my Facebook feed. I can only assume that everyone got it. Over hundred thousand people instantly commented on her post wishing her nothing but the best. 

The post is so sad to read even though it is a beautiful tribute to her husband, Dave Goldberg. The world has changed. Sheryl decided to share her emotions publicly on social media. Years ago, we all privately mourned. Maybe it’s better just to belt it out.

In any case, it is heartbreaking.

           

Social Media Networks For Nepal

   Our visit to Nepal a few years ago. Photos by Eliot Hess.  

There are many people who question the impact of social media on today’s society. Some people feel it’s done more harm than good.

I’m not one of those people. I’ve seen how social media has helped the lonely become a part of a community, helped others build new relationships, re-established old ones, and come to the aid of millions in time of need. 

Google and Facebook have taken major roles in helping people across the world connect after the tragedy from the Nepal earthquake. Both are offering services that connect family and friends in the United States with the people of Nepal.

Facebook has introduced the Safety Check, a feature that allows Americans to find out  If their loved ones are okay.  All the survivors have to do is report in. Google resurfaced its Person Finder to help locate missing family and friends. Their Internet tools work faster than traditional methods (waiting for embassies to report who survived).  


It’s comforting to know that the big social networking companies have taken an active role in using their core competencies to benefit others. It’s always so rewarding to watch successful companies giveback and show us how their skill sets make all the difference in the world.  

           

   

Technology Kills 

My friend’s father, a big time judge, died when he couldn’t get his iPhone to work. He mastered the iPad, but at 87, for some reason, his new iPhone was giving him trouble. He tried to work it for days. One night he told his wife, “I will never get this thing.” He had his dinner, went to sleep and never got up.

When I heard this story I thought to myself, “I can totally relate.” Not that I think I’m going to die, but I actually felt the Judge’s exasperation. We all get challenged by technology from time to time. If the Internet goes down, or I lost my passwords, or even if I can’t check-out of an online store, I get so frustrated. The out-of-control sensation really makes you feel like you are on the outside, looking in. You feel totally disconnected. I wonder if the judge felt so overwhelmed that he just gave up? 

I just wanted to share that story with you. Don’t give up. Call on someone to help you, I do that everyday.

News not to miss.

GoPro’s CEO makes $284 million a year. That’s four times as much money as Apple’s Tim Cook. Click here for the Mashable story. 

The Whitney Museum moved downtown in NYC. The video illustrations in the NY Times are cutting edge. Click here.

How Meryl Streep is Using Her Own Money to Combat Ageism and Sexism in Hollywood. A Vanity Fair exclusive. Click here

Largest Picasso painting in the world is getting a new New York City home. Nothing is forever. For the Mashable story, click here.

On a personal note.

Introducing the other H in HWH PR. Stanley Hochstadt, a prince of a man. It’s been years since we’ve seen each other, but I still feel close to him. I just became friends with him and his wife Sandy on Facebook. Thank you social media. 

  Sandy and Stanley Hochstadt 

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 Buddy, Can You Spare A Dime? 

Image from Nerdwallet.com
 
I’m curious what you all think about Facebook getting into the money business? I’m not sure I totally understand why Facebook friends would want to send money to each other. 
 
Facebook announced earlier this week that users of its messenger app would be able to attach their debit cards to the service. That means that Facebook friends would be able to transfer money to each other with a simple click. 
 
I know that Facebook has grander plans than just providing a friendly money exchange program. Speculation is that Facebook wants to be a big player in the e-commerce business. Analysts would love to see Facebook users buy products directly from advertisers. 
 
Despite my less than enthusiastic feelings about Facebook’s new program, I’m sure it will be successful. Facebook’s Messenger app is one of the largest platforms in the world. They have more than 500 million monthly users.

Facebook Founder Speaks Chinese


This may have been all over the mainstream press the other day, but I just wanted to point out that I find it pretty amazing that a successful person like Mark Zuckerberg just keeps accomplishing new challenges all the time. If I were him, I would probably be sitting on a lounge chair on some beach somewhere, watching the world go by.

The Facebook founder surprised a audience of students at Tsinghua University in Beijing earlier this week by speaking to them in Mandarin Chinese. The video above captures that moment.

His first words were, “I’m very glad to be in Beijing. I love this city. My Chinese is really a mess, but I study using Chinese every day.”

Nevertheless, he still managed to speak for a half hour on what Facebook is doing in China. I wonder what Zuckerberg’s true motivation was to learn a very difficult language. He’s married to a Chinese woman, Priscilla Chan, who was there to guide him all the way. Or, will there be some major growth spurts for Facebook in the Chinese market. We are just seeing the first signs now. Maybe, we all should be learning the language.

Facebook Is Not A Law Enforcement Issue

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You are not going to believe this. The
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department recently reported that local area residents call 911 when their Facebook doesn’t work.

While this is pretty funny, it’s also very sad. So many of us are addicted to social media. The minute it doesn’t work, we impulsively call the cops.
Facebook reported that “nervous residents feared that they were permanently cut off from the world of pictures of friends and their meals. They had been choking 911 and the regular police number.”

I also guess that Facebook is, for many folks, their connection to the outside world. Without it, they panic. I know many of my friends are Facebook voyeurs. They never post. They just snoop.

Okay by me.

My Take On Bossy

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Sheryl Sandberg

I have been bossy my entire life. I’m bossy in my business life as well as my personal one. I’m sure that plenty of people have called me bossy behind my back. They certainly have to my face. I know that I must not have liked It at the time but it never altered my life one bit nor did it give me much grief.

Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Marketing Officer of Facebook, has started a worldwide campaign through her Lean In organization to ban the word “bossy” when it comes to describing women because it has caused major career setbacks. Sandberg also said it deflates a young woman’s self esteem and discourages her from becoming a leader.

While I agree with Sandberg that calling someone bossy could be discouraging and hurtful, it should not be that painful for any woman.

This kind of thinking reminds me of the women I know who are afraid to walk Into a Louis Vuitton or Gucci store because they feel intimidated. That infuriates me because the sales staff are ordinary ladies who are taught to adopt a certain attitude. I tell friends to pretend they are the female version of Richard Gere in Pretty Woman. They have to demand that the retail staff suck up to them. It works every time.

My advice to women is to get a number of significant achievements under their belts before acting like a know-it-all. No one likes a smarty-pants. Once they have made their mark, then they can start asserting themselves. By the way, this is true for men too. Exercise common sense. You can’t go wrong.

Billionaires In Just Five Years

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Ever since I heard about Facebook buying WhatsApp a few weeks ago for billions of dollars, I really wanted to spell out this unbelievable story for you. Between some research on my part with business friends and a great story that is about to be published in Forbes, you will have enough of the facts to talk about it with your children and grandchildren

I doubt that when Jan Koum, 38 and Brian Acton, 42, founders of WhatsApp, started their company in 2009, they ever thought they would become billionaires just five years. But that’s exactly what happened when Facebook bought WhatsApp for $4 billion in cash, $12 billion in stock plus $3 billion in restricted shares.

WhatsApp is an instant message company that has handled 10 billion messages per day.

Koum was an engineer who moved from Ukraine to the U.S. with very little money. He will join the Facebook board and, after taxes, pocket $6.8 billion.

Acton was ex-Yahoo engineer who got turned down for jobs at Twitter and Facebook. He will make $3 billion after tax.

WhatsApp only generated $20 million in revenue but Zuckerberg believes this app is going to make him a lot of money.

Read the inside scoop from Forbes on WhatsApp by just clicking here.

From My Camera Roll

For those of you who are not on Facebook, I wanted to share some of my photos. I consider them collectibles.

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A friend posted this.

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Former HWH staffer Meghan Dougherty visited with us recently. She is a wife, mommy of two, and author of a soon-to-be-published tween novel. Remember, you saw her here first.

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The townhouses on East 62nd Street — all dressed up for next week!

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Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz spoke at the 92 Street Y. We live in her district in Miami.

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Dylan’s Candy Store getting ready for Chanukah.

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The real Teri Garr wrote this message on a blackboard hanging in Georgio’s Country Grill on 9th Avenue at 53rd Street.

We Never Had It So Good

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When we were in our 20s and 30s, no one was concerned about our work environment. We were just thrilled to get a paycheck.

Today, maturing digital companies in Silicon Valley, Seattle, and even New York, are literally building country clubs as offices in order to attract creative talent who are willing to work long hours.

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