The World’s Biggest Tech Show Is Next Week — and ”Lying On The Beach” Has Your Inside Pass

 

CES 2020 has 4500 Exhibitors and 15 miles of Aisles.

 


Steve Greenberg, Co-host of “Lying on the Beach,” has walked 24,000 steps each of the four days of CES. He wants to make sure he doesn’t miss any innovative products that he may want to introduce to TV audiences around the United States.

 


Lois Whitman-Hess, his podcast partner, has been attending CES since it first started 53 years ago. She spends her days in meetings discussing innovative marketing strategies with clients. In this episode, Steve and Lois are going to give you their take on what to expect at CES 2020.

 


Listen here – http://www.lyingonthebeach.com/2019/12/30/ces2020

 


If you love fashion and innovation, don’t miss this documentary on Amazon. See how the world was built before the Internet.


ABOUT DIANA VREELAND

DIANA VREELAND: THE EYE HAS TO TRAVEL is an intimate portrait and a vibrant celebration of one of the most influential women of the 20th century, an enduring icon whose influence changed the face of fashion, beauty, art, publishing and culture itself forever.


Along the way, the story of Vreeland illustrates the evolution of women into roles of power and prominence throughout the 20th century, and travels through some of the century’s greatest historical and cultural eras, including Paris’ Belle Epoque, New York in the roaring twenties, and London in the swinging sixties. It also spans such historical events as the great wars, the flights of Lindbergh, the romance of Wallis and Windsor, the Kennedy inauguration, and the freewheeling spirit of the 1960′s youthquake, and the advent of countless fashion revolutions from the bikini to the blue jean.


http://www.dianavreeland-film.com/

Gary Shapiro Speaks Out 

Gary Shapiro is president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, which represents more than 2,400 tech companies and owns and produces CES. 

The following was posted on Gary’s Facebook page last Friday

Way before the first Republican primary I have been consistent, clear and firm that Donald Trump is unfit to be President. He is divisive, appeals to our worst tribal instincts and is highly immoral. He hurt thousands of contractors and investors. He is lazy, didn’t prepare for debates or learn the basic facts about foreign or domestic policy. I disagree with the substantive positions he has taken. (The only redeeming virtues for me of a Trump presidency are restrictions on regulatory overreach, lower corporate taxes, investing in infrastructure and pro-business Supreme Court appointees).

But I am never Trump for two other big reasons: 

First, he will destabilize the world and should not be entrusted with our military and nuclear arsenal. This draft dodger for a foot bunion had the audacity to say multi-year POW Sen. McCain was no war hero.

Second, he is such a horrible immoral sexist, racist, nasty person he should not sit in the White House. The President sets the moral tone for the country and is a model for every child. For the last 40 years we have had R and D presidents who had different views but they were decent and ethical people. 

I want my children and future grandchildren to know I did what I could to stop this horrible person from being President. 

So I have written op eds, tweeted and opined.
Now I must vote. Despite having supported, contributed and advocated for the last few Republican presidential candidates, I am almost ready to vote for Sen. Clinton as she is experienced, stable and by every measure a better choice. She is good on tech policy, social issues and hopefully trade. Her husband was a great president who appreciated that businesses create jobs. 
I think she means well and although she began as a Republican, had adversity (NASA telling her at five that girls could not be astronauts, failing the bar – and other better known challenges) she did ground breaking work establishing rights of children and fighting for women globally. She also is passionate about the value of a free Internet. 
Of course she has issues. She does what unions want. She has several incidences of poor judgement which I hope she learned from. 

I hope she can understand that American companies are in a global battle and need a supportive government willing to let them hire the best and brightest and not face unfair tax and regulatory burdens.
In high school she ran for class president against a guy who said something like you are stupid if you vote for a girl for president. Well, I hope tens of millions of Americans vote for HRC not because she may be our first woman president but because she is highly qualified. Trump not only is unqualified, he is bad for our nation, our ideals and our children and the legacy of moral leadership we owe them.

Having written a best seller about innovation and ninja behavior, I can only say this is not the situation I preferred, but looking at all the options, a landslide vote for Sec. Clinton would be the best message we can send the haters, the party firsters and others who think Trump’s brand of nastiness, failure to take responsibility, and simplistic but idiotic fixes will make us better.

Interesting Facts from Gary Shapiro

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I am only halfway through Gary Shapiro’s book, “Ninja Innovation,” so I really shouldn’t be talking about it at this point but there are so many interesting tidbits that I have to start somewhere. Gary Shapiro is the President and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association, producers of the Consumer Electronics Show. He wrote this book to underscore the importance of “innovation.”

1. The first Consumer Electronics Show was held in New York City in June, 1967 at the Americana and Hilton Hotels. Attendance was 15,000 manufacturers, distributors, and retailers looking at 100 exhibits occupying a 100,000 square feet.

2. The 2012 International CES in Las Vegas attracted 156,000 attendees and 3,100 exhibits.

3. U.S. factory sales of consumer electronics exceeded $200 billion annually and worldwide sales topped $1 trillion for the first time.

4. The Internet was developed in 1969 by ARPANET, the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network which was founded by the United States Department of Defense in 1958 and charged with advanced technology research in the wake of the Russians launching Sputnik. The idea was to provide a decentralized communications network that would not be disrupted by potential global war. Academia became the biggest user of the net with researchers linking up their computers to share data.

5. Thirty-five years passed from the
invention of the Internet to when the
first American heard the famous
words “You’ve got mail.”